28 August 2011
Category:
Solar Explorer
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Neptune’s heart

Following on from yesterday’s post about orreries, I’ve decided to do a quick release with two changes. First, the promised option to disable the click noise. I’ve also turned the volume down on it a bit, when it is enabled. Secondly, rounding out the planets, as defined by science, Solar Explorer now has information about […]


20 August 2011
Category:
Solar Explorer
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Catching up with Cassini

Cassini has to considered to be the quiet achiever of space probes. It left Earth in 1997, arriving at Saturn in 2004. After Huygens touched down on Titan, Cassini has largely been forgotten by the public while superstars like the Voyager twins set new distance and longevity records, and the Spirit and Opportunity rovers discover […]


28 July 2011
Category:
Solar Explorer
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It rains on Saturn?

In a previous post I commented that the Solar System is soaking wet. Today we learned that there’s rain falling on Saturn. OK, so it’s not exactly a downpour. The “rain” is water vapor that’s being sprayed into space by ice volcanoes on Enceladus, a tiny fraction of which ends up raining onto Saturn. This […]


24 June 2011
Category:
Solar Explorer
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Salty geysers on Enceladus?

It looks like we might be able to add Saturn’s Enceladus to¬† to the growing list of moons that have the potential for liquid oceans under an outer crust of ice. Instead of specifically mentioning which moons have possible oceans in Solar Explorer, I should probably just point out the ones that are dry. It’d […]